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they want to keep that secret. thanks to this leak from edward snowd snowden, "the washington post" broke a blockbuster story and detailed for the first time what exactly is in the budget for the intelligence committee, including more than 21,000 employees at the cia. the first time we've seen this level. >> very fascinating reading that story. i know you looked over it. what stood out most for you?
years ago? >> "the washington post" calculate as best they could. it's difficult because we don't have historical information, either, like we didn't have this in the present day. this makes u.s. spending on intelligence now higher than it was even at the height of the cold war by, you know, $10 billion or so in current. >> really adds up when you put it together. thank you is much, amon.
, for secret u.s. intelligence efforts. "the washington post" reports that, among other things, the national security agency was investigating up to 4,000 reports of possibly security breaches by its own employees, last year. in economic news, the commerce department announced growth last spring was much better than
washington works, someone who has these relationships, someone who can get on the phone and get the president of the united states to pardon, you know, your fugitive client, that's a very, very marketable commodity. i mean, if you see -- if you are seen as someone who knows how this town works, someone who is a usual suspect in this town, you can dine out for years. that's why no one leaves. >> announcer: funding is provided by -- carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy, and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information a
finished. we examine why tonight on "washington week." >> we passed 27 bills, the lowest in the history of this country. 27 billings. gwen: and that was before the majority leader told senators to sit down and shut up. acrimony, gridlock and politics as usual. >> it's almost like there's a gone campaigning sign. outside the oval office. >> i have now run my last campaign. i do not intend to wait until the next campaign or the next president before tackling the issues that matter. >> the agenda of the republicans saying to the president our agenda is nothing and our timetable is never. >> we'll take this one step at a time and i'm sure the august recess will have our members in a better mood when they come back. gwen: is this is new normal for democrats and republicans to fight amongst themselves until the next election? we dig deeper on that tonight with dan balz of the "washington post," jackie calmes of "the new york times" and john dickerson of "slate" magazine and cbs news. >> award-winning reporting and analysis. covering history as it happens. live from our nation's capital, this
in washington, tonight on "washington week." more red lines crossed in syria. >> what we've seen indicates big eventis clearly a of grave concern. when you start seeing chemical weapons used on a large scale and, again, we're still gathering our information about this particular event, but it is very troublesome. >> there's no reason, if there's hide, for the regime not to let the investigative team in. gwen: more tough choices in egypt. >> what we're doing right now is theg a full evaluation of u.s.-egyptian relationship. >> we have the same objective. to see a democratic system in place in egypt. it ahn mccain and i called coup because that's exactly what it is. gwen: and new disclosures about ofernment surveillance american citizens. >> i think that the trust of the american people in their at staket is what's here. gwen: a trio of late summer dilemmas, plus -- 50 year later, we look back at the march may have changed america. gjelten the week, tom of npr, alexis simendinger of real clear politics and michael fletcher of "the washington post." >> award-winning reporting and analysis, coveri
warner has the latest on options for action in syria. then we return to the march on washington 50 years on. tonight reflections from the last living speaker, georgia congressman john liu business. >> it was all inclusive it was black and white, latino, asia asian-american and native american. >> they came from idaho, wyoming, and they were there. carrying their signs. >> and we conclude our series on governing in a time of gridlock with a look at how the entertainment world sees the nation's capital. >> the question we ask is if someone is actually getting something done, do the ends justify the means? it is an interesting question to ask when washington is paralyzed by gridlock. >> that is all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by... moving our economy for 160 years, bnsf the engine that connects us. >> and the hewlett foundation working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and this program was made possible by the corporation for pub
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
shocker. the washington post company sells its number and publishing assets to amazon.com founder. the deal capped the day of big news in print, online and in television. >> looser lending. new reports say banks are lowering standards for businesses, consumer and home buyers. does it signal a return to the bad old days of too easy credit? >> home grown, walmart pledges to buy american made goods. how it could affect manufacturing. we kick off a special series called made in america. >> it was a stunning late day capper today to a day of major news affecting the newspapers you read, the websites you visit, the tv networks you watch, and the cable systems you may subscribe to. amazon.com founder and ceo is buying the publishing business of the washington post company. which includes the fames newspaper for $250 million. the post long run by members of the eugene meyer and graham families reached the peak of its fame for tough reporting, during the watergate era. baso says, i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c., and our nation, and the post's values will n
driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public good, or are they in it for self-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment y
targets, long-term political hot potatoes. diana olick joins us from washington with more on what all this might mean. >> reporter: suzy, it should come as no surprise mortgage is front and center, as interest rates are rising, credit is the last barrier to full housing recovery. >> our housing market is beginning to heal. >> reporter: president obama returned to arizona, one of the hardest hit states in the housing crash four years after using this dessert backdrop. >> we got to turn the badpage o the bubble and bust. we need a housing system durable and fair and rewards responsibility for generations to come. >> reporter: it's reforming the nation's 10 trillion dollar mortgage market making it easier for home buyers and putting capital at the center of housing finance ask pulling government out. that means a gradual wind down of giants fannie mae and freddy mac, which together with the fha back over 90% of new loans. >> i believe our housing system should operate where there's a limited government role and pry vent lending should be the backbone of the housing market. >> reporter: t
the killing of civilians, washington refuses to condemned the generals for the recent power grab barack obama interrupted his holiday to do announce the violence. cannot determine the future of egypt. that is for the up -- egyptian people. we do not take sides with any particular party or political figure. to blame is tempting the united states or the west or some other actor, for what has gone wrong. he has canceled a planned military exercise with egypt. 1.3 billion dollars in american military aid is in the pipeline but will be reviewed. despite everything, egypt is a key for u.s. goals in the middle east. support is crucial to maintaining the peace treaty with israel. washington supports egypt against militants on israel's borders in the sinai. and the u.s. navy's access to the suez canal is controlled by egypt. and trieste house hard to work with whoever is in power in cairo. was mohamedly that morsi. today it is the military. it is a policy that has left them with no friends or influences in egypt. officials are saying there is no benefit anymore from supporting the generals. >> i think
on washington remains a seminal moment in american history. tonight, we kick off a series of discussions to mark the anniversary. >> we've forgotten most of the >> brown: and remembering a stalwart of american political journalism. we look back at the career of the long-time reporter, columnist and t.v. commentator, jack germond. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. >> brown: the political crisis in egypt reached a new turning point today. security forces made good on a pledge to sweep away sit-ins that sprang up after the military ousted president mohammed morsi in late june. the country's health ministry reported at least 235 civilians and 4
>> rose: welcome to the program. august 28, 2013, marks 50th anniversary of the march on washington, and the famous speech by dr. martin luther king jr. we talk this evening to congressman johning with, who was there with dr. king. >> we made a lot of progress. back in 1963, charlie, let me tell you, i saw those signs that said white waiting, colored waiting, those signs are gone. we passed the civil rights bill. we passed the voting right act, the fair housing act. and when people say to me nothing has checked. i say come and walk in my scooz. >> we talk with jonathan rider, isabelle wilkerson, and clarence jones. >> the march was nmy view, the culmination of 100 years of frustration and despair. 1963 began with the centennial, the 100th anniversary of the emancipation proclamation. and that means that when these people came together, those quarter of a million people came together, they were in some ways representing all the hopes and dreams that had idea yt to be fulfull fulfilled. >> rose: the 50th anniversary of the march on washington next. captioning sponsored by rose communi
.e.o. of the "washington post's" parent company, donald graham. >> warner: "i am the shooter," declared army major nidal hasan at the start of his trial in an attack that killed 13 at fort hood, texas. we look at today's opening arguments and early testimony. >> ifill: the pentagon eased financial pain for its employees by cutting unpaid furlough from 11 days to six. ray suarez discusses the budget cuts and terror threats with deputy secretary of defense ashton carter. >> our effort to deal with the current budget situation, we believe, has to be driven by strategy. that is, a view of the future. terrorism is one of those things that's going to be around. >> warner: and more than 1.5 million people have fled the bloody syrian civil war. we have an on-the-ground report from the world's second largest refugee camp in jordan. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental proble
challenging moments of diplomacy, the u.s. and russia held high-level meetings in washington. margaret warner recaps today's talks. >> brown: four out of ten street lights don't work and it takes an hour on average for detroit police to respond to 9-1-1 calls. hari sreenivasan looks at the motor city's battle amid bankruptcy. >> detroiters are so used to bad news, and they are so used to things not really breaking our way, and they're used to getting up the next morning and going, "well, i can't stop, i've got to keep going, i've got to keep trying." >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus analyze the week's news. >> brown: and yes, those are goats in that graveyard. more than a hundred of them. kwame holman tells us what they're doing in this historic washington, d.c., cemetery. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >>
sort out the details tonight on "washington week." who's listening in? >> i want to make clear. once again. that america is not interested in spying on ordinary people. i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. gwen: how dangerous is al qaeda? >> this is an ongoing process. we are not going to completely eliminate terrorism. gwen: how frosty are things with russia? >> i think there's always been some tension in the u.s.-russian relationship after the fall of the soviet union. gwen: and how frosty are things with congress? >> we're not in a normal atmosphere around here when it comes to "obamacare." gwen: these issues and more will follow the president as he leaves on vacation. we take a look with doyle mcmanus of the "los angeles times." martha raddatz of abc news. and alexis simendinger of realclearpolitics. >> award-winning reporting and analysis, covering history as happens, live from our nation's capital, this is "washington week with gwen ifill." corporate funding for "washington week" is provided by -- >> we went out and asked people a simple question -- how old is the oldest pe
of the march on washington. >> you look at how far we have come, but we still have so far to go. >> opposition forces claim the syrian government is killing large numbers of civilians, men, women and children with chemical weapons. russia says the rebels stage the attacks to drum up opposition to the asad regime. the asad regime says the claim is baseless. here is what president obama said a year ago. nowe have communicated in uncertain terms what every player in the region -- with every player in the region that that is a line -- red line for us. >> senator john mccain says the red line threat is a joke. >> the president of the united states says it would be a red line and a game changer. he now sees that as a green light. means the word of the president of the united states can no longer be taken seriously. >> president obama said he is sympathetic to mccain's passion, but he adds, sometimes what we have seen is that folks will call for immediate action, jumping into stuff, and it doesn't turn out well. the president says we have to think through strategically what will be in will be in our
world news america. reporting from washington, i am katty kay. as the world relate -- waits for a response to the theory and attack, forces are ready. >> we are ready to go. >> we are ready to go. order does come, what would military action look like? tonight, we assess the actions. a dream.id he had but 50 years after martin luther king delivered his famous speech, how much of it has come true? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. the u.s. is ready to launch a military strike against theory at a moments notice. that is what the defense secretary has told bbc news in an exclusive interview. the remarks came after suspected chemical attacks last week, and today, there was fresh fighting on the ground as the french point into the u.s. with some tough words on their own, saying they will punish those who decide to gas people. we start with our reporter who spoke to secretary chuck hagel. >> all dressed up and nowhere to go. were not able to carry out their work due to snipers, but due to which side, it is contested. was pretty c
crimes. and reading the tea leaves for 2016. i'm amy wolter in for gwen ifill. tonight on "washington week." >> the united states strongly condemns the steps that have been taken by egypt's interim government. amy: the president responds to the increasing violence in egypt. but how much influence does the u.s. have in the region? >> we violated our own rule of law by not calling it for what it is because our law clearly states that if it's a military coup then aid is cut off. they had the coup and we didn't do that. that's a blow to credibility. amy: the attorney general takes aim at those con victed of minor drug offenses. >> certain low level nonviolent drug offenders who have no ties to large scale organizations, gangs or cartels, will no longer be charged with offenses that impose draconian mandatory minimum sentences. amy: and hillary clinton laying the groundwork for 2016. >> many americans are asking how do we ensure that the law continues to serve and belong to the people in a time when ideology and gridlock have paralyzed our politics? amy: but is this man conceding anything?
of the "washington post." we'll talk about his book, "collission 2012: obama vs. romney and the future of elections in america." and also, about the sale of the "washington post." >> 2008 campaign was a campaign about hope and change, and an aspiration that barack obama gave to people that then he tried to fulfill. one of the reasons i called this book "collission 2012" was there was the america that voted in 2008 for barack obama, and there was the america that voted voten 2010 to bring republicans into power in the house, and the question was this was a clash between those two americas. >> rose: we conclude this evening with hugh laurie, the star of house, who has a new album, a blues albull called "didn't it rain." >> it's an extraordinary physical pleasure to me-- well, to everyone. this is a thing i keep thinking about with acting. acting is an intriguing and absorbing problem, but at the end of the day, after a hard day at work, nobody goes home and relaxes by doing a bit of acting. >> rose: same thing, yes. >> whereas with music, everybody-- no matter what their job is, it is probably one of
. >> brown: and we continue our look at the legacy of the march on washington 50 years on. tonight, reflections on the challenges ahead for martin luther king's vision for a multi-racial democracy. >> 40% of whites don't have friends outside of their own race. so in some ways we're still as segregated as we were 50 years ago and i think that king would be very concerned about that. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the united states worked today to firm up the intelligence behind claims that syria used chemical weapons and to win support fo
. >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. 19 of america's diplomatic posts will remain closed until the end of the week in response to a terror threat from al qaeda. >> we take the threat very seriously and have taken action because of that. >> protests in turkey after more than 200 are found guilty of trying to overthrow the government including the country's former army chief. and would you eat a hamburger made in the lab? . a breakthrough to everyone's astes. >> welcome to our views on public television in america and also around the globe. after shattering 21 diplomatic posts across the islamic world this weekend due to increased chatter about a possible al qaeda attack the united states has decided to keep 19 of them closed until the end of the week. only the embassies in iraq and afghanistan will reopen. today white house spokesman jay carney said the obama administration decided to take the steps out of an abundance of caution. >> we take the threat very seriously and have taken action because of that. i'm not in a position to discuss specific intelligence but we believ
extends beyond the border of washington state into british columbia. it's one of the largest and most biologically rich inland seas in the world. jeremiah julius is a fisherman from the lummi tribal community. the whole landscape is sacred to us. there's not much contaminant free lands left in the united states. this is one of them. >> reporter: for hundreds of generations, his tribe has relied on the halibut, salmon and crab that thrive in these waters. >> fishing is who we are. fishing is our culture. and to us, culture is fish. it's just in our blood. >> reporter: but there's a storm brewing at cherry point, just north of bellingham, washington. this is where s.s.a. marine wants to build the largest coal export terminal in north america. nearly 500 ships would travel these waters every year, carrying coal to the other side of the pacific. asia consumes more coal than rest of the world combined. in the next three years, countries there are expected to double the amount of coal they import today. that soaring demand spells opportunity for u.s. companies, according to bob waters, dire
officials might have met in washington, but the fact president obama called off a planned summit with vladimir putin is a sign of underlying tensions. many say this is not just about politics, but personality. and as long as barack obama and leonard could remain in office, tensions between america and russia will continue to exist. the men get on? at a white house press conference today, president obama gave us some insight. >> i know the press likes to focus on body language. slouch likekind of the board kit in the back of the conversation. the truth is when we're in conversations together, it is often very productive. >> body language aside. right now, there are no plans for a summit between these two men. the talks are being seen as a positive step in u.s.-russia relations. i discussed u.s. relations with russia with the former u.s. defense secretary william cohen. and i asked just how bad the relationship is. >> it has gotten very cool in the last several years, but since putin came back into power to be for sure. there were some helpful provisions and incentives to get back
at the march on washington 50 years on. tonight, reflections from one of its organizers, congresswoman eleanor holmes norton. >> it was startling to see so many people come. and i remember standing at the lincoln memorial, looking out. look, looking out was what was the sight for me, because i could not see the last person. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: the syrian government pounded rebel areas outside the capital, damascus, early today, and antigovernment activists said some rockets included chemical weapons that killed hundreds of people. .(children shouting/crying) women and children shielded their faces with handkerchiefs. while victims-- writhing in pain-- gasped for air,some foaming at the mouth. these amateur videos-- all posted on social media websites and cannot be i
and how it permanently changed politics. we talk to the washington post's dan balz about his book, "collision 2012." >> everything changes from one cycle to another. i don't think i've seen as many changes in one cycle as we saw between 2008 and 2012. >> brown: and can apps for babies be educational? or are they harmful entertainment? we look at one advocacy group's complaint to the federal trade commission. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: a badly damaged nuclear plant in japan loomed over budget talks today in tokyo. officials are working
with washington? we kick off a series on governing and leadership. tonight, three historians on partisanship and gridlock in the nation's capital. >> woodruff: and in an age of budget cuts, the u.s. space agency must rein in its orbits of exploration. we take a closer look at nasa's uncertain future. >> nasa for years has had a flat budget. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and by bnsf railway. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the situation in egypt took another volatile turn today with news that former president hosni mubarek might be released from prison. this comes amidst continuing violence, this time with mass shootings on the sinai peninsula. peninsula. a state of emergency remains in pleas
washington. i and katty kay. 24 policemen in egypt are killed in an ambush from suspected islamist militants as violence escalates on both sides. a juror in the edward snowden case fast to increase his efforts after his partner was to obtained under british anti- terror laws. prince william gives his first interview since becoming a father, giving a hint of what little george is really like. >> he is a bit of a rascal. we will put it that way. he reminds me of my brother or me when we were younger. i am not sure which. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america, and also around the globe. 24 policemen in egypt were ambushed and killed by suspected islamist militants today. 36 islamist militants died in police captivity. this violence shows little sign of ending. numeral reports that former president hosni mubarak could the released in a matter of weeks. not likely to make the situation there any calmer. jeremy bowen send this report. >> the dead policemen were thrown back to cairo's military airport. the government believes that al qaeda style jihadist killed the men. egypt's
, following his speech at the lincoln memorial today, 50 years after the march on washington. >> no one can match king's brilliance but the same flame can light the heart of all who are willing to take a first step towards justice. i know that flame remains. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> supported by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation. committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: there was a flurry of activity around the world today on what happens next in syria. at the united nations, britain submitted a resolution to the security council condemning syria for an alleged chemical attack, and authorizing the use of force in response. the u.n. envoy to syria, lakhdar brahimi, warned any military action mu
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 162 (some duplicates have been removed)